: : , :

 

 

:

(1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6) [B 01 n56]

  

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                                                                                .  

                                                                                  

                                                                                 .

                                                                                                                                                               (. )

 

     "Scandinavian Defence: 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6!?",   , ( ) "Chess Mail" (NN 69, 1998),   25 ( 20-   ), " " [B 01 n56].

 

 

Scandinavian Defence: 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6!?

by Michael Melts (USA), Master ICCF

 

    The Scandinavian Defence (The Center Counter) is one from the oldest chess opening (it was first recommended by Lucena in XV century). About 140 years (in fact after the seventh match game Morphy Anderssen, Paris 1858) chess players know 3...Qa5 line (after  1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3), and modern theory thinks that this line is the best for Black after 3. Nc3. The variation 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6

 

 

in fact is not well known for a lot of chess players, and this variation is not popular in modern chess theory Why? Maybe because there is opinion that "The queen is unfavorably placed on d6, compared to a5. First, there is no useful pin on the c3 knight, second the Queen can be harassed by Bf4" (John Emms "The Scandinavian", 1997) or same "The position of the Black queen on d6 is vulnerable in view of the eventual threats Nb5 and Bf4. Therefore, this line is inferior for Black" (Leonid Shamkovich's article "Two letters on the Center Counter Defence" from Chess Life, February 1998). But about queen on a5 chess players can tell by analogy "The position of the Black Queen on a5 is vulnerable in view of the eventual threats b2-b4 and Bd2". Why no? Why did not in the games (with 3...Qd6 line) Karpov Lutikov (USSR 1979) and Kasparov Wirth (Zurich 1988) both World Champions realize threats Nb5 or Bf4? Why do we see the 3... Qd6 line in the opening repertoire not only of legendary David Bronstein but sometimes and others Grandmasters and Masters, for example Kir. Georgiev, D. Donchev, R. Dzindzichashvili, A. Sygulski, T. Utasi, E. Mozes, C. Mann? Do they use this variation because only hope on effect from opening surprise or maybe do they have other opinion about this variation (which is different from opinion of modern chess theory about this variation)?

    The 3...Qd6 line was first recommended by William Norwood Potter (1840 1895) in 1885 (but unfortunately I do not have information in my database about any games by 3... Qd6 line before 1965!!). Mr. Potter was very strong chess player (match 1875 Potter Zukertort (+2, -4, =8); match 1879 Potter Mason (+5, -5, =11; Potter was 3rd behind Blackburn and Zukertort in 1876 handicap tournament but he won handicap tournaments in 1875 and 1878), and editor of his own magazine The City of London Chess Magazine in 1870's. Writing about Steinitz in his Manual of Chess, Emanuel Lasker said, "I heard in London that a London master, Mr. Potter, who loved unusual and strange moves, had influenced Steinitz greatly. They were friends, and Steinitz somehow began to copy Potter's style". Potter and Steinitz were partners in the correspondence match between London's and Vienna's chess clubs (1,5:0,5; 18721873).

    Sometimes you can see the name "Pytel Variation" because in The Chess Player 13/1977 Krzysztof Pytel from Poland (he lives in France now) wrote about opening of 9 games by this variation (unfortunately without any analysis but with using of the code system, like !?, ?, =, +=, =+, and others). Six games from this article played in 1970's by his wife, Bozena Pytel, two games played by Henryk Dobosz (Poland) in 1976, and one game (Turishchev Goubnitskij, USSR) played in 1968. You can see in publications of Eric Schiller (USA) the name "Eric Schiller Variation" of the 3... Qd6 line with c7-c6 because he played by this line since 1980 about 60 games. But Semyon Borisovich Goubnitskij (chess player from the former USSR, winner of the 2nd Correspondence Chess Europe Team Championship 19831988 and Master ICCF from Kharkov, the Ukraine) successfully began to use this variation since 1965, and played by 3... Qd6 line with c7-c6 much more games than Eric Schiller or other chess player (about one from his games, the game Turishchev Goubnitskij, USSR 1968 you can see information in the Encyclopaedia of Chess Opening, vol. "B", the 1st edition 1980, in Chess Informant 5/109 or in Chess in the USSR 6/1968). That is way I think will be right to name this 3... Qd6 line "Goubnitskij Pytel Variation" or even "PGP Variation" (Potter, Goubnitskij, Pytel).

    This variation has many lines, for example: lines without 4. d4 (for example: 4. g3, 4. Bc4, 4. Nf3); line 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nb5; line 4. d4 Nf6 5. h3; line 4. d4 Nf6 5. Bd3; line 4. d4 Nf6 5. Be3; line 4. d4 Nf6 5. Bg5; line 4. d4 Nf6 5. Bc4 (5... Bg4; 5... c6; 5... a6) and line 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nf3 with next alternatives: 5... Nc6; 5... c6 (6. Be2; 6. Ne5; 6. h3); 5... Bg4 (6. Be2;

6. h3); line 5... a6 (6. g3; 6. h3; 6. Ne5; 6. Bc4; 6. Bd3; 6. Be2; 6. Be3). In this article you will see only part of my analysis about some from these lines.

 

Conclusion

 

The using of this variation is very often unpleasant surprise for White now and not bad chance for Black to equalize position or even to win (I know that from my

experience I use this variation since 1970'; unfortunately I lost text of many my games when I emigrated to the USA). But there is and other (very important and objective) factor for explanation of using this variation: the queen is more active on d6 than a5 (center!). This factor helps to Black to equalize position and to have counter-play. As shows analysis, moves Nb5 and Bf4 are not very dangerous for Black if to know different tactical nuances. Usually White has a temporary development advantage in this variation. Therefore usually Black have to hold on a central strategy and does not have to try to open position in center by move e5 before a castling.

    Will change the modern theory opinion about this variation? Will be the line 3... Qd6 one of main variations in the Scandinavian Defense? On these and others questions can answer only chess practice and serious analytical works. As for me I think this variation will have interesting future!

    I thank my chess friends Hugh Myers (USA), Hanon Russell (USA), Semyon Borisovich Goubnitskij (Ukraine) and Timothy Harding (Ireland) for some materials what I used in this article.

 

 

(19651971),

[B 01 n56]

 

    1

    - () ()

    (, 1965)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. d4 c6 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. c4 Qd6 6. Nc3 Bg4 7. Be2 e6 8. 0-0 Be7 9. Qb3 Qb4 10. Qb4 Bb4 11. Ne5 Bc3 12. Ng4 Bd4 13. Rd1 c5 14. Nf6 gf 15. Bf3 Nc6

16. Bc6 bc 17. Rb1 Rb8 18. Be3 e5 19. Rd3 Ke7 20. Ra3 Rb7. [59 , 1/2:1/2]

 

    2

    . . () ()

    (, 1965)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 c6 5. Nf3 Bg4 6. Be2 Nf6 7. 0-0 e6 8. Re1 Bf3 9. Bf3 Be7 10. Ne4 Ne4 11. Be4 Nd7 12. c3 0-0 13. Qf3 Bf6 14. Bf4 Qe7 15. h3 Qd8

16. a3 a5 17. b4 ab 18. ab Nb6 19. b5 Nd5 20. bc bc 21. Bd2 Qb6 22. Rab1 Qc7 23. c4 Ne7 24. Bf4 Qa7 25. Be5 Be5 26. de Qc5 1/2:1/2.

 

    3

    () ()

    "" (, 1966)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 c6 5. Nf3 Bg4 6. h3 Bh5 7. Be2 Nf6 8. Bg5 e6 9. Qd2 Be7 10. 0-0-0 Nbd7 11. Kb1 Bf3 12. Bf3 Nb6 13. Bf4 Bb4 14. Ne4 1/2:1/2.

 

    4

    () ()

    "" (, 1966)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. Nf3 Bg4 5. Be2 c6 6. h3 Bh5 7. 0-0 Nf6 8. d4 e6 9. Ne5 Be2 10. Ne2 Be7 11. Bf4 Qb4 12. c3 Qb6 13. Nc4 Qd8 14. Qb3 b5 15. Ne5 0-0

16. a4 Qb6 17. ab cb 18. c4 bc 19. c5 Qb7 20. Ra4 Nd5. [41 , 1/2:1/2]

 

    5

    () ()

    "" (, 1966)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. Nf3 Bg4 5. Be2 c6 6. 0-0 Nf6 7. d4 e6 8. h3 Bh5 9. g4 Bg6 10. Ne5 Nd5 11. Nd5 Qd5 12. Bf3 Qd8 13. Ng6 hg 14. Bg2 Nd7 15. c4 Nb6

16. b3 Be7 17. Be3 Qc7 18. f3 0-0 19. Rfd1 Rad8 20. g5 Nc8 21. Rac1 Qa5 22. h4 Nd6 23. Rc2 Nf5 24. Qg4 Rd7 25. Bf3 Rfd8 26. c5 1/2:1/2.

 

    6

    () ()

    (, 1966)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 c6 5. Nge2 Bg4 6. f3 Bf5 7. Bf4 Qb4 8. Rb1 Nf6 9. a3 Qa5 10. b4 Qd8 11. Ng3 Bg6 12. Bc4 e6 13. Nge4 Be7 14. 0-0 0-0 15. Kh1 Nbd7 16. Bb3 Nd5 17. Ne2 N7f6 18. Nc5 b6 19. Nd3 Nh5 20. Qd2 Bd3 21. cd Ndf4 22. Nf4 Bg5 0:1.

    :

1) Melts M. Scandinavian Defence: The Dynamic 3... Qd6. Milford,  CT USA: Russell Enterprises Inc., 2001.

 

    7

    () ()

    (, 1966)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. d4 c6 4. Nc3 Qd6 5. Bc4 Nf6 6. Nge2 Bf5 7. Bf4 Qb4 8. Bb3 e6 9. 0-0 Qa5 10. Ng3 Be7 11. Nf5 Qf5 12. Ne2 1/2:1/2.

    :

     1) "Chess mail" (). NN 69, 1998. . "Scandinavian Defence: 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6!?". ( .)

 

    8

    () ()

    (, 1966)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. d4 c6 4. c4 Qd6 5. Nf3 Bg4 6. Be2 Nf6 7. Nc3 e6 8. 0-0 Be7 9. Be3 0-0 10. Qc2 Nbd7 11. Rfd1 Qc7 12. Rac1 Nb6 13. h3 Bh5 14. Qb3 Rad8

15. d5 Nc8 16. de fe 17. Nd4 Bf7 18. Bd3 Bd6 19. Ne4 Ne4 20. Be4 Be5. [55 , 0:1]

 

    9

    () ()

    (, 1966)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. Be2 Nf6 5. Nf3 c6 6. 0-0 Bg4 7. b4 g6 8. h3 Bf3 9. Bf3 Bg7 10. Rb1 0-0 11. b5 Nbd7 12. Re1 Nb6 13. Rb3 Qd7 14. bc bc 15. Qe2 e6

16. Qa6 Nfd5 17. Ne4 Qc7 18. c4 Nf6 19. c5 Ne4 20. Be4 Nd5 21. Rb7 Qf4 22. d4 Qh4 23. Bd5 cd 24. c6 Bc3 25. Re2 Qh5 26. Kf1 g5 27. Qa3 Bg7 28. c7 g4 29. Qf8 Rf8

30. Rb8 gh 31. Rf8 Bf8 32. gh Qh3 33. Ke1 Qh1 0:1.

    :

    1) Melts M. Scandinavian Defence: The Dynamic 3... Qd6. Milford, CT USA: Russell Enterprises Inc., 2001.

 

    10

    () ()

    (, 1967)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. d4 Qd6 4. Bd3 Nf6 5. Ne2 Bg4 6. f3 Bh5 7. Bf4 Qd8 8. Bg3 e6 9. 0-0 Be7 10. c3 0-0 11. Nd2 Nbd7 12. Qc2 Bg6 13. Bg6 hg 14. Rfe1 Nd5 15. Nc4 b5 16. Ne5 Ne5 17. Be5 Bd6 18. Ng3 Qe7 19. Qd2 Rfd8 20. Qe2 Rab8. [55 , 0:1]

 

    11

    () ()

    (, 1967)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 c6 5. Bc4 Nf6 6. Nf3 Bg4 7. Be3 e6 8. 0-0 Be7 9. Qe2 0-0 10. h3 Bf3 11. Qf3 Nbd7 12. Rad1 Qb4 13. Bb3 Nb6 14. a3 Qa5 15. Ne4 Ne4 16. Qe4 Bf6 17. c4 Qh5 18. f4 g6 19. Rd2 Qf5 20. Qf3 Bg7. [38 , 0:1]

    :

    1) "Chess mail". NN 69, 1998. . "Scandinavian Defence: 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6!?". ( .)

 

    12

    () ()

    (, 1967)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 c6 5. Bc4 Nf6 6. Nge2 Bg4 7. f3 Bf5 8. Bf4 Qb4 9. Bb3 e6 10. a3 Qa5 11. 0-0 Be7 12. Ng3 0-0? 13. d5 Nd5 14. Nd5 cd 15. Nf5 ef

16. Bd5 Nc6 17. Kh1 Bf6 18. c4 Bb2 19. Rb1 Be5 20. Be5 Ne5 21. Rb7 Rac8. [63 , 1:0]

    :

    1) "Chess mail". NN 69, 1998. . "Scandinavian Defence: 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6!?". ( .)

 

    13

    () ()

    (, 1967)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. Nf3 Bg4 5. Be2 c6 6. h3 Bf3 7. Bf3 Nf6 8. d4 e6 9. 0-0 Be7 10. Be3 0-0 11. Ne2 Nbd7 12. Ng3 Nb6 13. Qe2 Rfd8 14. c4 Qc7 15. Rfd1 Rd7 16. Qc2 Rad8 17. Ne2 Nc8 18. Nf4 Bd6 19. Nd3 Ne7 20. Ne5 Be5. [33 , 1/2:1/2]

 

    14

    () ()

    "" (, 1968)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 Nf6 5. Bg5 c6 6. Bc4 Bg4 7. f3 Bf5 8. Nge2 e6 9. Qd2 Be7 10. h4 h6 11. Bf4 Qb4 12. Bb3 Nbd7 13. g4 Bg6 14. Bc7 Nb6 15. Nf4 Nfd5 16. a3 Qa5 17. Bd5 ed 18. Ng6 fg 19. Qd3 0-0 20. Qg6 Rae8 21. Kf2 Bf6 22. Rad1 Re7 23. Bd6 Re6 24. Bb4 Qb4 25. ab Bd4 26. Rd4 Rg6 27. b3 1/2:1/2.

    :

    1) " " (). N 6, 1968.

    2) "Sachovsky Informator" (). 5, 1968. N 109.

    3) Schwarz R. Handbuch der Schach-Eroffnungen. Band 26: Verlag Das Schach-Archiv Rattmann, 1969.

    4) "The Chess Player" (). N 13, 1977. ( . .)

    5) " " (). "", 1, 1980. ( .)

    6) Nielsen N. Scandinavisk. Brabrand, Denmark: Skakcentralens, 1982.

    7)  "Chess mail". NN 69, 1998. ( . "Scandinavian Defence: 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6!?".)

    8) Melts M. Scandinavian Defence: The Dynamic 3... Qd6. Milford, CT USA: Russell Enterprises Inc., 2001.

 

    15

    . () ()

    " " (, 1968)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. Bc4 Nf6 5. d4 c6 6. Nge2 Bg4 7. h3 Be2 8. Qe2 e6 9. 0-0 Be7 10. Bg5 0-0 11. Rad1 Nbd7 12. Rfe1 Nb6 13. Bd3 Nbd5 14. Ne4 Ne4

15. Qe4 g6 16. Bh6 Rfd8 17. c3 Rd7 18. Bc2 Rad8 19. Qf3 Bf8 20. Bg5 Be7. [51 , 0:1]

    :

    1) "Chess mail". NN 69, 1998. . "Scandinavian Defence: 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6!?". ( .)

 

    16

    () ()

    "" (, 1969)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. d4 c6 4. Nf3 Bg4 5. Be2 Nf6 6. 0-0 e6 7. Nc3 Qd6 8. Ne5 Be2 9. Qe2 Be7 10. Be3 Nbd7 11. f4 0-0 12. Kh1 Rfd8? 13. Rae1 g6 14. Nc4 Qc7 15. f5 Nf8 16. fg hg 17. Qf2 N8h7 18. Ne5 Bf8 19. Bf4 Qe7 20. Ne4 Ne4. [58 , 1/2:1/2]

 

    17

    () ()

    "- " (- [], 1969)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Bc4 c6 6. h3 Bf5 7. d4 Nbd7 8. a4 e6 9. 0-0 Be7 10. a5 0-0 11. Ne2 Nd5 12. Bd3 Bd3 13. Qd3 Rfd8 14. c4 Nb4 15. Qb3 c5

16. dc Qc5 17. Be3 Qf5 18. Ned4 Qd3 19. Qd3 Nd3 20. a6 ba 21. Nc6 Bf6. [35 , 1:0]

 

    18

    () ()

    " " (, 1969)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nf3 c6 6. Be2 Bg4 7. 0-0 Bf3 8. Bf3 e6 9. Rc1 Be7 10. Ne4 Ne4 11. Re4 Qd8 12. Qd3 Nd7 13. Re1 Nf6 1/2:1/2.

 

    19

    () ()

    "" () "" () (, 1969)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nge2 Bg4 6. f3 Bf5 7. Bf4 Qd8 8. Ng3 Bg6 9. h4 h5 10. Bd3 Bd3 11. Qd3 c6 12. 0-0-0 e6 13. Rhe1 Be7 14. Nc4 Na6

15. Neg5 Nb4 16. Qb3 Nbd5? 17. Be5 Qb6 18. Qd3 a5 19. Nge4 Nb4 20. Qc4 Qa6. [60 , 1:0]

    (, . , "", , , ...)

 

    20

    () ()

    (, 1969)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nf3 Bg4 6. h3 Bh5 7. g4 Bg6 8. Ne5 c6 9. Bg2 Nbd7 10. Bf4 Ne5 11. de Qd1 12. Rd1 Nd7 13. Rd2 e6 14. Ne4 Be4 15. Be4 Be7 16. Ke2 0-0-0 17. Rhd1 1/2:1/2.

 

    21

    () ()

    "" (, 1969)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 Nf6 5. Bd3 c6 6. Nge2 Bg4 7. f3 Bh5 8. Ne4 Qd8 9. c3 e6 10. Nf4 Bg6 11. Ng6 hg 12. Qb3 Qc7 13. Bg5 Be7 14. Bf6 gf 15. 0-0-0 Nd7 16. g3 f5 17. Nd2 0-0-0 18. f4 Nc5 19. dc Rd3 20. Qc4 Rd5 21. Nb3 Rd1 22. Kd1 g5 23. fg Bg5 24. Kc2 Qe5 25. Nd2 Bf6 0:1.

 

    22

    () ()

    "" (, 1970)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 Nf6 5. Bc4 c6 6. Nge2 Bg4 7. f3 Bf5 8. Bf4 Qd8 9. g4 Bg6 10. Qd2 e6 11. 0-0-0 Nbd7 12. h4 h5 13. Bg5 hg 14. fg b5 15. Bb3 b4

16. Na4 Ne4 17. Qe3 Ng5 18. hg Rh1 19. Rh1 Be7 20. Kb1 Bg5. [74 , 1/2:1/2]

    :

    1) "Chess mail". NN 69, 1998. . "Scandinavian Defence: 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6!?". ( .)

 

    23

    () ()

    (, 1970)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 Nf6 5. Bc4 c6 6. Nf3 Bg4 7. Be3 Nbd7 8. h3 Bh5 9. 0-0 e6 10. a3 Be7 11. Re1 Qc7 12. Be2 0-0 13. Ng5 Be2 14. Qe2 h6 15. Nge4 Ne4 16. Ne4 Nf6 17. Nf6 1/2:1/2.

    :

    1) "Chess mail". NN 69, 1998. . "Scandinavian Defence: 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6!?". ( .)

 

    24

    () ()

    "" (, 1971)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 Nf6 5. Bc4 c6 6. Nge2 Bg4 7. f3 Bf5 8. 0-0 e6 9. Ng3 Bg6? 10. f4 b5 11. Bb3 b4 12. Ne2 Bf5 13. Nf5 ef 14. Ng3 g6 15. Re1 Be7

16. Qe2 h5? 17. c3 Nbd7 18. Rf1 Ne4 19. Nd2 Ndf6 20. Nc4 Qc7. [50 , 1:0]

 

    25

    () ()

    "" (, 1971)

    1. e4 d5 2. ed Qd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 Nf6 5. Bc4 c6 6. Nge2 Bg4 7. f3 Bf5 8. Bf4 Qd8 9. h4 h5 10. Qd2 e6 11. a3 Nbd7 12. 0-0-0 Nb6 13. Bd3 Bd3 14. Qd3 Nbd5

15. Bg5 Be7 16. Kb1 Qa5 17. Bd2 Qc7 18. Ne4 b5 19. Rdg1 Nb6 20. Nf6 Bf6. [64 , 1/2:1/2]

    :

    1) "Chess mail". NN 69, 1998. . "Scandinavian Defence: 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6!?". ( .)